ArchwayOnline Course Catalog: High School

Students may choose from the following CORE credits and Electives. It is recommended to build an Education Plan with an AO Counselor.

(*indicates 1 semester course)

English Language Arts

English 9 (A&B)

This freshman-year English course engages students in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, students will master comprehension and literary-analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce clear, coherent writing. Students will read a range of classic texts including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” They will also study short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

 

English 10 (A&B)

Focused on application, this sophomore English course reinforces literary analysis and twenty-first century skills with superb pieces of literature and literary nonfiction, application e-resources, and educational interactives. Each thematic unit focuses on specific literary analysis skills and allows students to apply them to a range of genres and text structures. As these units meld modeling and application, they also expand on training in media literacy, twenty-first century career skills, and the essentials of grammar and vocabulary. Under the guidance of the eWriting software, students also compose descriptive, persuasive, expository, literary analyses, research, narrative, and compare-contrast essays. 

 

English 11 (A&B)

This junior-year English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts as the centerpieces of this course. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, students master comprehension and literary analysis strategies. Interwoven in the lessons across two semesters are tasks that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills and produce creative, coherent writing. Students read a range of short but complex texts, including works by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

 

 English 12 (A&B)

This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the Modern Period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain. 

Honors Language Arts 9 (A&B)

This freshman honors English course invites students to explore a variety of diverse and complex texts organized into thematic units. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, both classic and contemporary. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and literary nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. In addition to activities offered to students in core courses, honors students are given additional opportunities to create and to participate in project-based learning activities, including writing a Shakespearian sonnet and creating an original interpretation of a Shakespearian play. Honors students will read a range of classic texts, including Homer’s The Odyssey, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Jack London’s “To Build a Fire” and Richard Connell’s “The Most Dangerous Game.” Students will also read Sue Macy’s full length nonfiction work Wheels of Change: How Women Rode the Bicycle to Freedom (With a Few Flat Tires Along the Way), and will study a variety of short but complex texts, including influential speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan. Contemporary texts by Richard Preston, Julia Alvarez, and Maya Angelou round out the course.

 

Honors Language Arts 10 (A&B)

Prerequisite: Honors Language Arts 9

This sophomore-year English course provides engaging and rigorous lessons with a focus on academic inquiry to strengthen knowledge of language arts. Honors reading lessons require analyzing complex texts, while concise mini-lessons advanced writing and research skills to craft strong, compelling essays and projects. Students will write argumentative and analytical essays based on literary texts, as well as an informative research paper using MLA style. Throughout the course, students read a range of classic and contemporary literary texts including Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis. In addition to reading a wide range of literary texts, students read and analyze complex informational and argumentative texts including Sonia Sotomayor’s “A Latina Judge’s Voice,” Niccolò Machiavelli’s The Prince, and the contemporary informational text Sugar Changed the World: A Story of Magic, Spice, Slavery, Freedom, and Science 

Honors Language Arts 11 (A&B)                            Prerequisite: Honors Language Arts 10

 This junior-year honors English course invites students to delve into American literature from early American Indian voices through contemporary works. Students will engage in literary analysis and inferential evaluation of great texts, including the full length novel The Awakening by Kate Chopin. While critically reading fiction, poetry, drama, and expository nonfiction, honors students will master comprehension, use evidence to conduct in-depth literary analysis, and examine and critique how authors develop ideas in a variety of genres. Interwoven throughout the lessons are activities that encourage students to strengthen their oral language skills, research and critically analyze sources of information, and produce clear, coherent writing. To round out the course, students will read a range of short but complex texts, including Henry David Thoreau’s essay “Civil Disobedience,” Floyd Dell’s drama King Arthur’s Socks, and works by Emily Dickinson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Martin Luther King, Jr., F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sandra Cisneros, Amy Tan, and Dave Eggers.

 

Honors Language Arts 12 (A&B)

Prerequisite: Honors Language Arts 11

This senior-level English course offers fascinating insight into British literary traditions spanning from Anglo-Saxon writing to the modern period. With interactive introductions and historical contexts, this full-year course connects philosophical, political, religious, ethical, and social influences of each time period to the works of many notable authors, including Chaucer, William Shakespeare, Queen Elizabeth I, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Virginia Woolf. Adding an extra dimension to the British literary experience, this course also exposes students to world literature, including works from India, Europe, China, and Spain.

 

English Language Learning Courses

English language learning classes are available to those students with identified, unique language needs which cannot be appropriately met in traditional classes. These classes cover grade-level content standards as well as Arizona ELD standards in Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening. 

 

 

Mathematics

PreAlgebra 

This full-year course is designed for high school students who have completed a middle school mathematics sequence but are not yet algebra-ready. This course reviews key algebra readiness skills from the middle grades and introduces basic Algebra I work with appropriate support. Students revisit concepts in numbers and operations, expressions and equations, ratios and proportions, and basic functions. By the end of the course, students are ready to begin a more formal high school Algebra I study.


Algebra I 

This full-year course focuses on five critical areas: relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations, linear and exponential relationships, descriptive statistics, expressions and equations, and quadratic functions and modeling. This course builds on the foundation set in middle grades by deepening students’ understanding of linear and exponential functions, and developing fluency in writing and solving one-variable equations and inequalities. Students will interpret, analyze, compare, and contrast functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Quantitative reasoning is a common thread throughout the course as students use algebra to represent quantities and the relationships among those quantities in a variety of ways. Standards of mathematical practice and process are embedded throughout the course, as students make sense of problem situations, solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

Honors Algebra I

This full-year honors course introduces students to linear, exponential, and quadratic functions by interpreting, analyzing, comparing, and contrasting functions that are represented numerically, tabularly, graphically, and algebraically. Technology is utilized within some lessons to further support students in identifying key features as well as displaying images of the functions. The course builds upon the basic concepts of functions to include transformations of linear and non-linear functions. Students deepen their understanding of quantitative reasoning, piecewise functions, and quadratic functions through performance tasks. The additional performance-based skills allow the honors students to apply more of the concepts taught in the course. The course concludes with students analyzing data through displays and statistical analysis.

 

Geometry 

This course formalizes what students learned about geometry in the middle grades with a focus on reasoning and making mathematical arguments. Mathematical reasoning is introduced with a study of triangle congruency, including exposure to formal proofs and geometric constructions. Then students extend what they have learned to other essential triangle concepts, including similarity, right-triangle trigonometry, and the Laws of Sines and Cosines. Moving on to other shapes, students justify and derive various formulas for circumference, area, and volume, as well as cross-sections of solids and rotations of two-dimensional objects. Students then make important connections between geometry and algebra, including special triangles, slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines, and parabolas in the coordinate plane, before delving into an in-depth investigation of the geometry of circles. The course closes with a study of set theory and probability, as students apply theoretical and experimental probability to make decisions informed by data analysis. 

Honors Geometry


The course begins by exploring the foundational concepts of Euclidean Geometry in which students learn the terminology of geometry, measuring, proving theorems, and constructing figures. Students then expand on their knowledge of transformations and complete an assignment on identifying point symmetry as well as completing a performance task on tessellations. The course continues with an in-depth look at triangles where students prove theorems, relating congruency and similarity in terms of transformations, and connecting right triangles relationships to trigonometry. Students study set theory and apply probability through theoretical and experimental probability, two-way tables, and combinations and permutations. With lessons pertaining to quadrilaterals, students can identify the various figures based on their key features. Within the circles units, students identify angles, radii, and chords, perform a performance-based task on tangents, and then compute the circumference and area of various circles. Then students study parabolas, ellipses and hyperbolas before modeling and computing two- and three-dimensional figures.

 

Algebra II 

This course focuses on functions, polynomials, periodic phenomena, and collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with a review of linear and quadratic functions to solidify a foundation for learning these new functions. Students make connections between verbal, numeric, algebraic, and graphical representations of functions and apply this knowledge as they create equations and inequalities that can be used to model and solve mathematical and real-world problems. As students refine and expand their algebraic skills, they will draw analogies among the operations and field properties of real numbers and those of complex numbers and algebraic expressions. Mathematical practices and habits of mind are embedded throughout the course, as students solve novel problems, reason abstractly, and think critically.

Honors Algebra II

The course begins with a review of concepts that will assist students throughout the course, such as literal equations, problem solving, and word problems. Students then progress to a unit on functions where students compute operations of functions, compose of functions, and study inverses of functions. To build on their algebraic skills, students learn about complex numbers and apply them to quadratic functions via the completing the square and quadratic formula methods. Next, students solve linear systems and apply their knowledge of the concept to three-by-three systems. An in-depth study on polynomial operations and functions allow students to build their knowledge of polynomials algebraically and graphically. In the second semester, students study nonlinear functions. Students solve and graph rational and radical functions whereas the exponential and logarithmic functions focus on the key features and transformations of the functions. Expected value and normal distribution concepts expand students’ knowledge of probability and statistics. Students also cover trigonometric functions and periodic
phenomena.

 

Financial Math 

Connecting practical mathematical concepts to personal and business settings, this course offers informative and highly useful lessons that challenge students to gain a deeper understanding of financial math. Relevant, project-based learning activities cover stimulating topics such as personal financial planning, budgeting and wise spending, banking, paying taxes, the importance of insurance, long-term investing, buying a house, consumer loans, economic principles, traveling abroad, starting a business, and analyzing business data. Offered as a two-semester course for high school students, this course encourages mastery of math skill

 

Pre-Calculus (Not required; can be 4th year Math)

With an emphasis on function families and their representations, Precalculus is a thoughtful introduction to advanced studies leading to calculus. The course briefly reviews linear equations, inequalities, and systems and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students then discover the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Scaffolding rigorous content with clear instruction, the course leads students through an advanced study of trigonometric functions, matrices, and vectors. The course concludes with a short study of probability and statistics.

 

Mathematical Models with Application (Not required)

Broadening and extending the mathematical knowledge and skills acquired in Algebra I, the primary purpose of this course is to use mathematics as a tool to model real-world phenomena students may encounter daily, such as finance and exponential models. Engaging lessons cover financial topics, including growth, smart money, saving, and installment-loan models. Prior mathematical knowledge is expanded and new knowledge and techniques are developed through real-world application of useful mathematical concepts.

 

Statistics (Not required; can be 4th year Math)

This fourth-year high school math option provides a comprehensive introduction to data analysis and statistics. Students begin by reviewing familiar data displays through a more sophisticated lens before diving into an in-depth study of the normal curve. They then study and apply simple linear regression and explore sampling and experimentation. Next, students review probability concepts and begin a study of random variables. Later topics also include sampling distributions, estimating and testing claims about proportions and means, and inferences and confidence intervals.

 

 

Trigonometry (Not required; can be 4th year Math)

In this one-semester course, students use their geometry and algebra skills to begin their study of trigonometry. Students will be required to express understanding using qualitative, quantitative, algebraic, and graphing skills. This course begins with a quick overview of right-triangle relationships before introducing trigonometric functions and their applications. Students explore angles and radian measures, circular trigonometry, and the unit circle. Students extend their understanding to trigonometric graphs, including the effects of translations and the inverses of trigonometric functions. This leads to the laws of sines and cosines, followed by an in-depth exploration of trigonometric identities and applications. This course ends with an introduction to the polar coordinate system, complex numbers, and DeMoivre’s theorem.

Integrated Math I

The first in an integrated math series for high school, this course formalizes and extends middle school mathematics, deepening students’ understanding of linear relationships. The course begins with a review of relationships between quantities, building from unit conversion to a study of expressions, equations, and inequalities. Students contrast linear and exponential relationships, including a study of sequences, as well as applications such as growth and decay. Students review one-, two-, and multi-step equations, formally reasoning about each step using properties of equality. Students extend this reasoning to systems of linear equations. Students use descriptive statistics to analyze data before turning their attention to transformations and the relationship between algebra and geometry on the coordinate plane.

 

Integrated Math II

This course begins with a brief exploration of radicals and polynomials before delving into quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, including a derivation of the quadratic formula. Students then embark on a deep study of the applications of probability and develop advanced reasoning skills with a study of similarity, congruence, and proofs of mathematical theorems. Students explore right triangles with an introduction to right triangle trigonometry before turning their attention into the geometry of circles and making informal arguments to derive formulas for the volumes of various solids.

 

 

Integrated Math III

This course synthesizes previous mathematical learning in four focused areas of instruction. First, students relate visual displays and summary statistics to various types of data and to probability distributions with a focus on drawing conclusions from the data. Then, students embark on an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, and radical functions, drawing on concepts of integers and number properties to understand polynomial operations and the combination of functions through operations. This section of instruction builds to the fundamental theorem of algebra. Students then expand the study of right-triangle trigonometry they began in Mathematics II to include non-right triangles and develop the laws of sines and cosines. Finally, students model an array of real world situations with all the types of functions they have studied, including work with logarithms to solve exponential equations. As they synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families, students appreciate the usefulness and relevance of mathematics in the real world.

Intermediate Algebra

This Intermediate Algebra course provides a friendly yet in-depth review of algebra skills and concepts. This course covers: Basic algebraic operations, equations and inequalities, polynomials, functions, rational expressions, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, and graphing.

Science

 

Physical Science

This full-year course focuses on basic concepts in chemistry and physics and encourages exploration of new discoveries in the field of physical science. The course includes an overview of scientific principles and procedures and has students examine the chemical building blocks of our physical world and the composition of matter. Additionally, students explore the properties that affect motion, forces, and energy on Earth. Building on these concepts, the course covers the properties of electricity and magnetism and the effects of these phenomena. As students refine and expand their understanding of physical science, they will apply their knowledge to complete interactive virtual labs that require them to ask questions and create hypotheses. Hands-on wet lab options are also available.

 

Biology 

This compelling two-semester course engages students in the study of life and living organisms and examines biology and biochemistry in the real world. This is a yearlong course that encompasses traditional concepts in biology and encourages exploration of new discoveries in this field of science. The components include biochemistry, cell biology, cell processes, heredity and reproduction, the evolution of life, taxonomy, human body systems, and ecology. This course includes both hands-on wet labs and virtual lab options.

 

Honors Biology A&B 

This compelling full-year course engages students in a rigorous honors-level curriculum that emphasizes the study of life and its real-world applications. This course examines biological concepts in more depth than general biology and provides a solid foundation for collegiate level coursework. Course components include biochemistry, cellular structures and functions, genetics and heredity, bioengineering, evolution, structures and functions of the human body, and ecology. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing. 

 

Chemistry 

This rigorous, full-year course engages students in the study of the composition, properties, changes, and interactions of matter. The course covers the basic concepts of chemistry and includes eighteen virtual laboratory experiments that encourage higher order thinking applications, with wet lab options if preferred. The components of this course include chemistry and its methods, the composition and properties of matter, changes and interactions of matter, factors affecting the interactions of matter, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, nuclear chemistry, mathematical applications, and applications of chemistry in the real world.

Honors Chemistry A&B

This rigorous two-semester course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes mathematical problem solving and practical applications of chemistry. Topics are examined in greater detail than general chemistry in order to prepare students for college-level coursework. Course components include atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, states and changes of matter, chemical and redox reactions, stoichiometry, the gas laws, solutions, acids and bases, and nuclear and organic chemistry. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing. 

 

Earth & Space Science

Students enrolled in this dynamic course explore the scope of Earth sciences, covering everything from basic structure and rock formation to the incredible and volatile forces that have shaped and changed our planet. As climate change and energy conservation become increasingly prevalent in the national discourse, it will be important for students to understand the concepts and causes of our changing Earth. Earth Science is a two-semester course that provides a solid foundation for understanding the physical characteristics that make the planet Earth unique and examines how these characteristics differ among the planets of our solar system.

 

Environmental Science

Environmental science is a captivating and rapidly expanding field, and this two-semester course offers compelling lessons that cover many aspects of the field: ecology, the biosphere, land, forests and soil, water, energy and resources, and societies and policy. Through unique activities and material, high school students connect scientific theory and concepts to current, real-world dilemmas, providing them with opportunities for mastery in each of the segments throughout the semester.

Anatomy and Physiology

This yearlong course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology—including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students will learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students will investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.

 

Physics (Not required; can be 3rd year Science)

This full-year course acquaints students with topics in classical and modern physics. The course emphasizes conceptual understanding of basic physics principles, including Newtonian mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students solve mathematical problems, reason abstractly, and learn to think critically about the physical world. The course also includes interactive virtual labs and hands-on lab options, in which students ask questions and create hypotheses.

Honors Physics A&B (Not required; can be 3rd year Science)

This rigorous full-year course provides students with an engaging honors-level curriculum that emphasizes abstract reasoning and applications of physics concepts to real-world scenarios. Topics are examined in greater detail than general physics and provide a solid foundation for collegiate-level coursework. Course components include one- and two-dimensional motion, momentum, energy and thermodynamics, harmonic motion, waves, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear and modern physics. Throughout the course, students participate in a variety of interactive and hands-on laboratory activities that enhance concept knowledge and develop scientific process skills, including scientific research and technical writing. 

Social Studies

World History

This yearlong course examines the major events and turning points of world history from ancient times to the present. Students investigate the development of classical civilizations in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia, and they explore the economic, political, and social revolutions that have transformed human history. At the end of the course, students conduct a rigorous study of modern history, allowing them to draw connections between past events and contemporary issues. The use of recurring themes, such as social history, democratic government, and the relationship between history and the arts, allows students to draw connections between the past and the present, among cultures, and among multiple perspectives. Throughout the course, students use a variety of primary and secondary sources, including legal documents, essays, historical writings, and political cartoons to evaluate the reliability of historical evidence and to draw conclusions about historical events.

U.S History I

U.S. History is a year-long course that examines the major events and turning points of U.S. history from the Industrial Revolution through the modern age. The course leads students toward a clearer understanding of the patterns, processes, and people that have shaped U.S. history. As students progress through each era of modern U.S. history, they will study the impact of dynamic leadership and economic and political change on the rise of the United States to global prominence, the influence of social and political movements on societal change, and the importance of modern cultural and political developments. Recurring themes lead students to draw connections between the past and the present, between cultures, and between multiple perspectives.

Honors U.S. Government*

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process. The course culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and
organizations in promoting policy approaches. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments, and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing a full informative essay.

 

Economics* 

Available as either a semester or a full year, this course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free-enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical-thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

Honors Economics*


This year-long honors level course invites students to broaden their understanding of how economic concepts apply to their everyday lives—including microeconomic and macroeconomic theory and the characteristics of mixed-market economies, the role of government in a free enterprise system and the global economy, and personal finance strategies. Throughout the course, students apply critical thinking skills while making practical economic choices. Students also master literacy skills through rigorous reading and writing activities. Students analyze data displays and write routinely and responsively in tasks and assignments that are based on scenarios, texts, activities, and examples. In more extensive, process-based writing lessons, students write full-length essays in informative and argumentative formats.

Government & Civics*

This semester-long course provides students with a practical understanding of the principles and procedures of government. The course begins by establishing the origins and founding principles of American government. After a rigorous review of the Constitution and its amendments, students investigate the development and extension of civil rights and liberties. Lessons also introduce influential Supreme Court decisions to demonstrate the impact and importance of constitutional rights. The course builds on this foundation by guiding students through the function of government today and the role of citizens in the civic process and culminates in an examination of public policy and the roles of citizens and organizations in promoting policy changes. Throughout the course, students examine primary and secondary sources, including political cartoons, essays, and judicial opinions. Students also sharpen their writing skills in shorter tasks and assignments and practice outlining and drafting skills by writing full informative and argumentative essays.

World Geography

Examining current global issues that impact our world today, this course takes a thematic approach to understanding the development of human systems, human understanding of the world, and human social organization. Divided into two semesters, this high school-level course will challenge students to develop geographic skills, including learning to interpret maps, analyze data, and compare theories. Offering interactive content that will grow students’ understanding of the development of modern civilization and human systems—from the agricultural revolution to the technological revolution—this course encourages students to analyze economic trends as well as compare global markets and urban environments.

 

 

Modern Language

Spanish I 

Students begin their introduction to high school Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, and multimedia cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas.

 

Spanish II 

High school students continue their introduction to Spanish with fundamental building blocks in four key areas of foreign language study: listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Each unit consists of an ongoing adventure story, a new vocabulary theme and grammar concept, numerous interactive games reinforcing vocabulary and grammar, reading and listening comprehension activities, speaking and writing activities, cultural presentations covering major Spanish-speaking areas in Europe and the Americas, and assessments.

General Electives

Art History I

Introducing art within historical, social, geographical, political, and religious contexts for understanding art and architecture through the ages, this course offers high school students an in-depth overview of art throughout history, with lessons organized by chronological and historical order and world regions. Students enrolled in this one-semester course cover topics including early Medieval and Romanesque art; art in the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; fifteenth-century art in Europe; sixteenth century art in Italy; the master artists; High Renaissance and Baroque art; world art, which includes the art of Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific cultures; eighteenth and nineteenth-century art in Europe and the Americas; and modern art in Europe and the Americas.

 

Introduction to Art

Covering art appreciation and the beginning of art history, this course encourages students to gain an understanding and appreciation of art in their everyday lives. Presented in an engaging format, this one-semester course provides an overview of many introductory themes: the definition of art, the cultural purpose of art, visual elements of art, terminology and principles of design, and two- and three-dimensional media and techniques. Tracing the history of art, high school students enrolled in the course also explore the following time periods and places: prehistoric art, art in ancient civilizations, and world art before 1400. 

 

Visual Arts

Visual Art is a two semester course that focuses on teaching high school students the fundamentals of art and design skills, including drawing, composition, and principles of two-dimensional and three-dimensional design. The course is designed to encourage creativity in students and help them develop foundational skills in art and design. The course is divided into units, which cover various topics such as perspective and color, light and shadow, materials and tools, line and shape, invention and construction, and the appreciation of the different forms of visual arts. All skill levels are welcome to participate.

 

Introduction to Computer Science

This full-year course is designed for students in grades 9–10, although any students across grades 9–12 may enroll. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can affect the world. Students have creative, hands-on learning opportunities to create computer programs, develop web pages, design mobile apps, write algorithms, and collaborate with peers while building strong foundational knowledge. This course provides a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills that students can use immediately.

 

Online Learning and Digital Citizenship*

This one-semester course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to online learning, including how to work independently, stay safe, and develop effective study habits in virtual learning environments. Featuring direct-instruction videos, interactive tasks, authentic projects, and rigorous assessments, the course prepares students for high school by providing in- depth instruction and practice in important study skills such as time management, effective note-taking, test preparation, and collaborating effectively online. By the end of the course, students will understand what it takes to be successful online learners and responsible digital citizens.

 

Contemporary Health

Available as either a semester course or a year-long course, this high-school health offering examines and analyzes various health topics. It places alcohol use, drug use, physical fitness, healthy relationships, disease prevention, relationships and mental health in the context of the importance of creating a healthy lifestyle. Throughout the course, students examine practices and plans they can implement in order to carry out a healthy lifestyle, and the consequences they can face if they do not follow safe practices. In addition, students conduct in-depth studies in order to create mentally and emotionally healthy relationships with peers and family, as well as nutrition, sleeping, and physical fitness plans. Students also examine and analyze harassment and bullying laws.

Note: This course covers issues of sex and gender identity, same-sex relationships, contraception, and other sensitive topics. For a more conservative approach to health education, the Healthy Living course is also available.

 

Foundations of Personal Wellness

Exploring a combination of Health and fitness concepts, this comprehensive and cohesive course explores all aspects of wellness. Offered as a two-semester course designed for high school students, coursework uses pedagogical planning to ensure that students explore fitness and physical health and encourages students to learn about the nature of social interactions and how to plan a healthy lifestyle.

Note: This course contains content from both Healthy Living and Lifetime Fitness; to avoid duplication, students should take either those one-semester courses or this full-year course.

 

Healthy Living*

Encouraging students to make responsible, respectful, informed, and capable decisions about topics that affect the well-being of themselves and others. This high school course provides students with comprehensive information they can use to develop healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Available as either a semester or year-long course, this informative and engaging course encourages students to recognize that they have the power to choose healthy behaviors to reduce risks.

 

Lifetime Fitness*

Exploring fitness topics such as safe exercise and injury prevention, nutrition, and weight management, this course equips high school students with the skill they need to achieve lifetime fitness. Available as either a semester or year-long course, Lifetime Fitness encourages students to assess individual fitness levels according to the five components of physical fitness levels: cardiovascular health, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Personal fitness assessments encourage students to design a fitness program to meet their individual fitness goals.

 

Personal Finance*

This introductory finance course teaches what it takes to understand the world of finance and make informed decisions about managing finances. Students learn more about economics and become more confident in setting and researching financial goals as they develop the core skills needed to be successful. In this one-semester course, students learn how to open bank accounts, invest money, apply for loans, apply for insurance, explore careers, manage business finances, make decisions about major purchases, and more. Students will be inspired by stories from finance professionals and individuals who have reached their financial goals.

 

Psychology

This two-semester course introduces high school students to the study of psychology and helps students’ master fundamental concepts in research, theory, and human behavior. Students analyze human growth, learning, personality, and behavior from the perspective of major theories within psychology, including the biological, psychosocial, and cognitive perspectives. From a psychological point of view, students investigate the nature of being human as they build a comprehensive understanding of traditional psychological concepts and contemporary perspectives in the field. Course components include an introduction to the history, perspectives, and research of psychology; an understanding of topics such as the biological aspects of psychology, learning, and cognitive development; the stages of human development; aspects of personality and intelligence; the classification and treatment of psychological disorders; and psychological aspects of social interactions.

 

Sociology

Providing insight into the human dynamics of our diverse society, this is an engaging, two-semester course that delves into the fundamental concepts of sociology. This interactive course, designed for high school students, covers cultural diversity and conformity, basic structures of society, individuals and socialization, stages of human development as they relate to sociology, deviance from social norms, social stratification, racial and ethnic interactions, gender roles, family structure, the economic and political aspects of sociology, the sociology of public institutions, and collective human behavior, both historically and in modern times.

 

Strategies For Academic Success

Offering a comprehensive analysis of different types of motivation, study habits, and learning styles, this one-semester course encourages high school and middle school students to take control of their learning by exploring varying strategies for success. Providing engaging lessons that will help students identify what works best for them individually, this one-semester course covers important study skills, such as strategies for taking high-quality notes, memorization techniques, test-taking strategies, benefits of visual aids, and reading techniques.

 

The CREW: Credits Received for Electives by Working

CREW credit enables students to earn credit while working or volunteering on an approved job site and learning through the experience. Students will receive a pass/fail grade only for CREW credit. Students may earn 1⁄2 CREW credit for every 50 hours of approved paid or volunteer experience. Students can earn up to six (6) CREW credits that will go towards their electives. Students can only earn work-based learning credit for hours worked while enrolled in Graduation Solutions or Smart Schools.

 

 

Career Tech Electives

Career Tech Education (CTE)

Keyboarding and Applications *

Keyboarding and Applications is a semester-long course that teaches students keyboarding skills, technical skills, effective communication skills, and productive work habits. Students learn proper keyboarding techniques. Once students have been introduced to keyboarding skills, lessons include daily practice of those skills. Students gain an understanding of computer hardware, operating systems, file management, and the Internet. In addition, students apply their keyboarding skills and create a variety of business documents, including word processing documents and electronic presentations. Required materials: word-processing software (e.g., MS Word), presentation software (e.g., MS PowerPoint).

Introduction to Computer Science

Introduction to Computer Science is a year-long course designed for students in grades 9-10, although any students across 9-12 may enroll. This course introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and challenges them to explore how computing and technology can impact the world. Students have creative, hands-on learning opportunities to create a computer program, develop a web page, design a mobile app, write algorithms, and collaborate with peers while building a strong foundational knowledge base. This course provides a solid foundation for more advanced study as well as practical skills they can use immediately. Required Materials: Activities in this course require that Python is installed on students’ computers.

Career Planning & Development

Introducing high school students to the working world, this course provides the knowledge and insight necessary to compete in today’s challenging job market. This relevant and timely course helps students investigate careers as they apply to personal interests and abilities, develop the skills and job search documents needed to enter the workforce, explore the rights of workers and traits of effective employees, and address the importance of professionalism and responsibility as careers change and evolve. This one-semester course includes lessons in which students create a self-assessment profile, a cover letter, and a resume that can be used in their educational or career portfolio.

Computer Applications – Office 2019/Office 365

This full year course introduces students to the features and functionality of the most widely-used productivity software in the world: Microsoft®Office®. Through video instruction, interactive skills demonstrations, and hands-on practice assignments, students learn to develop, edit and share Office®2019 documents for both personal and professional use. By the end of this course, students will have developed basic proficiency in the most common tools and features of the Microsoft Office suite of applications: Word®, Excel®, Outlook®, and PowerPoint®. Note: This course includes examples from both Office 2019 and Office 365. Required Materials: Students access to MS Office 2019 or Office 365 preferred.

Health Science Concepts

This year-long course introduces high school students to the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology— including the organization of the body, cellular functions, and the chemistry of life. As they progress through each unit, students learn about the major body systems, common diseases and disorders, and the career specialties associated with each system. Students investigate basic medical terminology as well as human reproduction and development. Students are introduced to these fundamental health science concepts through direct instruction, interactive tasks, and practice assignments. This course is intended to provide students with a strong base of core knowledge and skills that can be used in a variety of health science career pathways.